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How Fiber Optic Media Converters Work- How Fiber Optic Media Converters Works-Fiber Optic Media Converters-Fiber Media Converters- Fiber Optic Media Converter- Fiber Optic Converters-Fiber Optic Converter

The answer to How Fiber Optic Media Converters Work, How Fiber Optic Media Converters Works is a questions (s) that has been driven in recent years by the factit has become apparent that fiber-optics are steadily replacing copper wire as an appropriate means of communication signal transmission. They span the long distances between local phone systems as well as providing the backbone for many network systems. Other system users include cable television services, university campuses, office buildings, industrial plants, and electric utility companies. This is an overview of fiber-optic technology, telecommunication applications, fiber-optic advantages and disadvantages, and fiber-optic economics.

A fiber-optic system is similar to the copper wire system that fiber-optics is replacing. The difference is that fiber-optics use light pulses to transmit information down fiber lines instead of using electronic pulses to transmit information down copper lines. Looking at the components in a fiber-optic chain will give a better understanding of how the system works in conjunction with wire based systems.

How a fiber optic media converter works:

The following diagrams show how you can take a mulititude of applications and transport them via a fiber optic cable (singlemode or mulitmode) to another location up to 80 km away.

The answer to How Fiber Optic Media Converters Work, How Fiber Optic Media Converters Works is a questions (s) that has been driven in recent years by the factit has become apparent that fiber-optics are steadily replacing copper wire as an appropriate means of communication signal transmission. They span the long distances between local phone systems as well as providing the backbone for many network systems. Other system users include cable television services, university campuses, office buildings, industrial plants, and electric utility companies. This is an overview of fiber-optic technology, telecommunication applications, fiber-optic advantages and disadvantages, and fiber-optic economics.

A fiber-optic system is similar to the copper wire system that fiber-optics is replacing. The difference is that fiber-optics use light pulses to transmit information down fiber lines instead of using electronic pulses to transmit information down copper lines. Looking at the components in a fiber-optic chain will give a better understanding of how the system works in conjunction with wire based systems.

At one end of the system is a transmitter. This is the place of origin for information coming on to fiber-optic lines. The transmitter accepts coded electronic pulse information coming from copper wire. It then processes and translates that information into equivalently coded light pulses. A light-emitting diode (LED) or an injection-laser diode (ILD) can be used for generating the light pulses. Using a lens, the light pulses are funneled into the fiber-optic medium where they transmit themselves down the line.Light pulses move easily down the fiber-optic line because of a principle known as total internal reflection. "This principle of total internal reflection states that when the angle of incidence exceeds a critical value, light cannot get out of the glass; instead, the light bounces back in. When this principle is applied to the construction of the fiber-optic strand, it is possible to transmit information down fiber lines in the form of light pulses.There are generally five elements that make up the construction of a fiber-optic strand, or cable: the optic core, optic cladding, a buffer material, a strength material and the outer jacket (Fig. 1). The optic core is the light carrying element at the center of the optical fiber. It is commonly made from a combination of silica and germania. Surrounding the core is the optic cladding made of pure silica . It is this combination that makes the principle of total internal reflection possible. The difference in materials used in the making of the core and the cladding creates an extremely reflective surface at the point in which they interface. Light pulses entering the fiber core reflect off the core/cladding interface and thus remain within the core as they move down the line.

Surrounding the cladding is a buffer material used to help shield the core and cladding from damage. A strength material surrounds the buffer, preventing stretch problems when the fiber cable is being pulled. The outer jacket is added to protect against abrasion, solvents, and other contaminants.

Once the light pulses reach their destination they are channeled into the optical receiver. "The basic purpose of an optical receiver is to detect the received light incident on it and to convert it to an electrical signal containing the information impressed on the light at the transmitting end. The electronic information is then ready for input into electronic based communication devices, such as a computer, telephone, or TV.

3. FIBER-OPTIC APPLICATIONS

The use of fiber-optics was generally not available until 1970 when Corning Glass Works was able to produce a fiber with a loss of 20 dB/km. It was recognized that optical fiber would be feasible for telecommunication transmission only if glass could be developed so pure that attenuation would be 20dB/km or less. That is, 1% of the light would remain after traveling 1 km. Today's optical fiber attenuation ranges from 0.5dB/km to 1000dB/km depending on the optical fiber used. Attenuation limits are based on intended application.

The applications of optical fiber communications have increased at a rapid rate, since the first commercial installation of a fiber-optic system in 1977. Telephone companies began early on, replacing their old copper wire systems with optical fiber lines. Today's telephone companies use optical fiber throughout their system as the backbone architecture and as the long-distance connection between city phone systems.

Cable television companies have also began integrating fiber-optics into their cable systems. The trunk lines that connect central offices have generally been replaced with optical fiber. Some providers have begun experimenting with fiber to the curb using a fiber/coaxial hybrid. Such a hybrid allows for the integration of fiber and coaxial at a neighborhood location. This location, called a node, would provide the optical receiver that converts the light impulses back to electronic signals. The signals could then be fed to individual homes via coaxial cable.

Local Area Networks (LAN) is a collective group of computers, or computer systems, connected to each other allowing for shared program software or data bases. Colleges, universities, office buildings, and industrial plants, just to name a few, all make use of optical fiber within their LAN systems.

Power companies are an emerging group that have begun to utilize fiber-optics in their communication systems. Most power utilities already have fiber-optic communication systems in use for monitoring their power grid systems.

4. FIBER-OPTIC ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES

There are several advantages that have been established with the development and implementation of fiber-optic cable systems. Compared to copper, optical fiber is relatively small in size and light in weight. This characteristic has made it desirable as intra-floor conduits and wiring duct space has become increasing plugged with expanded copper cable installation .

Optical fiber is also desirable because of it's electromagnetic immunity. Since fiber-optics use light to transmit a signal, it is not subject to electromagnetic interference, radio frequency interference, or voltage surges. This may be an important consideration when laying cables near electronic hardware such as computers or industrial equipment. As well, since it does not use electrical impulses, it does not produce electric sparks which can be an obvious fire hazard.

Advances in optical fiber technology has lead to decreases in signal loss, or attenuation. As an electric pulse or a light pulse travels down it's respective cable line, it will eventually lose signal energy due to imperfections in the transmission medium. To keep the signal going, it must be boosted every so often along the medium line. A signal regenerator is used to boost the electronic pulse in a copper cable. An optical repeater is used to boost the light pulse in a fiber-optic cable. The advantage of optical fiber is that it performs better with respect to attenuation. Fiber-optic cable needs fewer boosting devices, along the same length of line, than copper cable.

A characteristic feature of optical fiber that has yet to be fully realized is it's potentially wide bandwidth. Bandwidth refers to the amount of information that a fiber can carry. The greater the bandwidth, the greater the carrying capacity of the optical fiber. It is said that currently, the fastest fibre circuits used in trunk connections between cities and countries carry information at up to 2.5 gigabits per second, enough to carry 40,000 telephone conversations or 250 television channels. Experts predict larger bandwidths than this as light frequency separation becomes available. Private communication systems are already using much higher bandwidths.

A disadvantage of the fiber-optic system is it's incompatibility with the electronic hardware systems that make up today's world. This inability to interconnect easily requires that current communication hardware systems be somewhat retrofitted to the fiber-optic networks. Much of the speed that is gained through optical fiber transmission can be inhibited at the conversion points of a fiber-optic chain. When a portion of the chain experiences heavy use, information becomes jammed in a bottleneck at the points where conversion to, or from, electronic signals is taking place. Bottlenecks like this should become less frequent as microprocessors become more efficient and fiber-optics reach closer to a direct electronic hardware interface.

5. FIBER-OPTIC ECONOMICS

One of the initial economic factors to consider when converting to fiber-optics is the cost of replacing wire systems with fiber. Increased demand for optical fiber has brought the prices down within competitive range of copper. Cable sales are expected to increase. However, since transmitters, converters, optical repeaters, and a variety of connecting hardware will be needed, the initial cost of changing over to fiber can be expensive. Increased demand, advances in the technology, and competition has brought the prices down somewhat.

Short term and long term gains should be considered when updating a communications system. In the short term it is often less expensive to continue using copper cabling for covering expanded communication needs. By simply adding more wire to an existing system, expanded needs can be covered. This avoids the expense of adding the transmitters and receivers needed for integrating optical fiber. Long term needs, however, may require more expansion in the future.

In the long term it may be more cost effective to invest in conversion to fiber-optics. This cost effectiveness is due to the relative ease of upgrading fiber optics to higher speeds and performance. It has already been seen in the industry as communication providers are wiring customers with optical fiber bandwidth that exceed consumer bandwidth needs. This is in anticipation of future bandwidth needs. It is generally accepted that customers will need increased bandwidth as the information highway grows. Replacing copper with fiber today would avoid continued investment in a soon to be outdated copper system.

Recent changes in the laws regulating the telecommunications industry have helped to promote and spur the use of fiber optics. The passage of the Telecommunications Act of 1996 has helped this effort by allowing television and telephone companies to enter each others markets. Fiber optics will play a pivotal role in this race since the bandwidth needed for providing an all-in-one service with television, telephone, interactive multimedia, and internet access is not available in much of the wiring of America.

6. SUMMARY

Based on industry activity, it is evident that fiber-optics have become the industry standard for terrestrial transmission of telecommunication information. The choice is not whether to convert to optical fiber, but rather when to convert to optical fiber. The bandwidth needs of the Information Superhighway require a medium, like optical fiber, that can deliver large amounts of information at a fast speed. It will be difficult for copper cable to provide for future bandwidth needs. Satellite and other broadcast media will undoubtedly play a role alongside fiber optics in the new world telecommunications order.

Considering all the services that the telecommunications industries are announcing to be just around the corner, and a modern society that seems to be expecting them.

Frequently Asked Questions

Question: Does ATS offer Single Mode devices?
Answer: Yes. ATS offers a single mode version of every product.

Question: What type or size of fiber optic cable do I need?
Answer: ATS' products work with all types and sizes of fiber optic cable. Because the type and size of fiber optic cable can affect transmission distances, it is a good idea to verify the type and size of your fiber optic cable BEFORE ordering a connectivity device.

Question: If I need a special product, can ATS build me something special?
Answer: The answer is frequently "yes." In many situations, TC can modify connectors, increase loss budgets, etc. to meet a customer's needs. Each situation must be individually examined. The feasibility of customizing an order often depends on the amount of Engineering time required and the size of the order.

Question: What does Loss Budget mean?
Answer: For a given fiber optic device, this is the difference between launch power and receiver sensitivity.

Question: What type of fiber optic connectors should I use?
Answer: ST connectors are most commonly used for communications applications.

Question: What type of information does ATS need to verify that that a customer is ordering the right type of equipment for their application?
Answer: There are 13 basic questions that typically need to be answered:

(1) What is the system topology? (e.g. point-to-point, bus/string, ring, self-healing ring...)

(2) What type of ATS device do you think you need (e.g. modem, multiplexer, converter, transceiver...)

(3) What type of fiber optic cable are you going to use? (e.g. multimode 850nm, 1300nm; single mode 1300nm, 1550nm...)

(4) What type of fiber optic connector are you using (e.g. ST, FC, SC, SMA...)

(5) How many fibers are between devices? (e.g. One - Simplex Transmission; One - Duplex Transmission; Two - Duplex Transmission; Three/RGB...)

(6) What is the distance between the devices you are connecting? (e.g. 2 kilometers, 20 kilometers...)

(7) What type of Electrical Interface are you using? (e.g RS-232, RS-366, RS-422, RS-449, RS-485 2-wire or 4-wire, RS-530, V.35, T1, E1, AUI, UTP/10BaseT, BNC/10Base2, Audio - 600 ohm, Video...)

(8) What clock type are you using? (e.g. Asynchronous; Synchronous - Internal or External Clock...)

(9) What Control Signals do you need? (e.g. RTS, CTS, DSR, DTR, CD...)

(10) What is your device type? (e.g. DTE or DCE)

(11) What is the transmission rate do you require? (e.g. 19.2 Kbps, 56 Kbps, 1.544 Mbps...)

(12) What fiber optic loss budget do you require? (total of connector loss & attenuation plus safety margin [3dB] for a given fiber optic link). Typical loss budget for a device would be 17dB, 20dB, 25dB...)

(13) What type of power source do you require? (e.g. 12VDC, 24VDC, -48VDC, 115VAC, 230 VAC...)

Application Notes

A wireless telephone service provider was looking for an affordable solution to connect Nortel cellular switches over long distances. Nortel Networks’s cellular switches are only available with multimode fiber interfaces. These interfaces are used to connect their switches in a Central Office to a MicroCell switch in a Base Transmit Station, where the cellular antennas are located. This works well in densely populated areas where the Base Transmit Stations are located relatively close, within 2 km, to the Central Office.

The wireless service provider wanted to offer their services in rural areas. But the number of potential customers in these sectors didn’t justify the large capital expenditures required to install additional Central Offices and Base Transmit Stations. What they needed was a solution to connect the Base Transmit Stations back to their Central Office over distances greater then the multimode cable could handle.

Single mode fiber cable has the bandwidth capabilities to transmit signals over the distances required by the service provider. By utilizing Transition Networks’s® single mode to multimode 622Mbps converters, they were able to use single mode fiber cable to connect the Base Transmit Stations located up to 60km from the Central Office. The Transition Networks solution has allowed the service provider to save time and money in their network deployment, and reduced the hardware requirements to provide wireless services to customer in these remote cellular sectors.

In the diagram, Transition Networks’s 13-slot Point System Chassis, housing several single mode to multimode converters, was mounted in the same rack as the Nortel Cellular switch. Short multimode patch cables connected the switch to the media converters. Next the converters were connected to the single mode fiber installed between the central office and the various Base Transmit Stations located throughout the rural areas where the service provider wanted to offer their wireless services. Within each Base Transmit Station, a Transition Single Slot chassis and another media converter was installed to make the final connection to the Nortel MicroCell Switch which interfaces with the antennas.

The single mode to multimode converters offered by Transition Networks are not protocol specific, but are based on the data transmission speed. In this example, the Nortel equipment uses a proprietary protocol, which transmits at 634 Mbps and the Transition Networks converters were able to work with that data rate. Transition also offers similar converters designed to work in Fast Ethernet (100Mbps) and Gigabit Ethernet (1000Mbps) environments.

 

 

Multimode Fiber Optic Media Converters

Save Money with Quality- Economical Multimode Fiber Optic Media Converters Below

Multimode Fiber Optic Media Converters American Tech Supply Part Number Multimode Fiber Optic Media Converter Description Price Each-Please Call For Discounts!  

Multimode Fiber Optic Media Converter

ATS102502 Fiber Media Converter

Multimode Fiber Optic Media Converter-100Base TX to FX RJ45- SC Multimode Media Converter

$69.88 each

Multimode Fiber Optic Media Converter

ATS102503 Fiber Optic Media Converter

Multimode Fiber Optic Media Converter -10/100 Fiber Media Converter SC/MM 1310nm 2Km

$ 68.88each
Multimode Fiber Optic Media Converter ATS102504 Fiber Optic Media Converter

Multimode Fiber Optic Media Converter-10/100 Fiber Media Converter ST/MM 1310nm 2Km

$68.88each
Multimode Fiber Optic Media Converter ATS102505 Fiber Optc Media Converter

Multimode Fiber Optic Media Converter-10/100 Fiber Media Converter LC/MM 1310nm 2Km

$82.88each
Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converters

American Tech Supply Part Number

SINGLEMODE Fiber Optic Media Converter Description Price
Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converter ATS102506 Fiber Optic Media Converter

Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converter-10/100 Fiber Media Converter- SC/SM 1310nm 15Km

$88.88each
Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converter ATS102507 Fiber Optic Media Converter

Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converter-10/100 Singlemode Fiber Media Converter SC/SM 1310nm 30Km

$95.88ea
Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converter ATS102508 Fiber Optic Media Converter Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converter-10/100 Singlemode Fiber Media Converter SC/SM 1310nm 40Km $99.88 ea
Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converter ATS102509 Fiber Optic Media Converter

Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converter-10/100 Singlemode Media Converter ST/SM 1310nm 15Km

$ 88.88 ea
Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converter ATS102510 Fiber Optic Media Converter

Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converter-10/100 Fiber Media Converter ST/SM 1310nm 30Km

$99.88 ea
Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converter ATS102511 Fiber Optic Media Converter

Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converter-10/100 Media Converter ST/SM 1310nm 40Km

$99.88 ea
Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converter ATS102512 Fiber Optic Media Converter

Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converter-10/100 Fiber Media Converter LC/SM 1310nm 15Km

$ 109.88 ea
Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converter ATS102513 Fiber Optic Media Converter

Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converter-10/100 Fiber Media Converter LC/SM 1310nm 30Km

$ 120.88ea
Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converter ATS102514 Fiber Optic Media Converter

Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converter-10/100 Singlemode Fiber Media Converter LC/SM 1310nm 40Km

$ 125.88
Multimode/Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converter ATS102514 Fiber Optic Media Converter

Multimode/ Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converter-Gigabit Fiber Optic Media Converter- SC-MM/850nm to SC-SM/1310

$ 248.88ea

Signamax provides media conversion solutions that support data, voice, video and image transport over a wide variety of transmission media. These products convert a wide variety of data — from serial RS-232 through Standard, Fast, Gigabit Ethernet and SONET/SDH protocols. Conversions from twisted-pair copper cable, coaxial cable, multimode fiber and singlemode fiber, to other types of cable are all possible with the wide array of solutions from Signamax Connectivity Systems. Signamax Fiber Optic Media Converters

Redundant Gigabit Industrial Ethernet Fiber Optic Switch
(Model TC3820)-
The TC3820 is frequently used to interconnect Remote Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) in high bandwidth applications, such as interconnecting traffic control video cameras, that require multiple channels and the reliability of a Self-healing Ring Topology.

Generic Fiber Optic Media Converters- Save Hundreds of Dollars With Our Quality Media Converters

Low Cost Generic Fiber Optic Media Converters 100 Base FX Multi-Mode to Single-Mode Converter, SC Connector (Multi-Mode2Km to Single Mode 20Km) - 10 Slot Rack Chassis With Simplex Power Supply, Designed to Work With 10 of the CXL32, CXL-B3, CXL-G2, CXL-BG, and CXL-C Series Media Converters.- Gigabit Media Converter,Ethernet 1000Mbps (BIDI) Bi-Directional, 20Km, Single Mode, SC Connector (Tx:1310nm and Rx:1550nm Over One Fiber), With Support Web Function, For Use With CXL-1600

IMC Networks Media Converters- Network managers worldwide rely on the MediaConverter series when converting twisted pair cabling to fiber optics. The modular MediaConverter series is the most cost-effective, flexible solution for everyday fiber networking in the LAN, campus network, outside plant and MAN applications. Complete Selection Of Fiber Optic Media Converters- Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converters-Mulitmode Fiber Optic Media Converters- Stand Alone Fiber Optic MEdia Converters- Industrial Fiber Optic Media Converters- Gigabit Fiber Optic Media Converters-T1-E-1 Fiber Optic Media Converters-Copper To Fiber Media Converters

Signamax Fiber Optic Media Converters- Signamax provides media conversion solutions that support data, voice, video and image transport over a wide variety of transmission media. These products convert a wide variety of data — from serial RS-232 through Standard, Fast, Gigabit Ethernet and SONET/SDH protocols. Conversions from twisted-pair copper cable, coaxial cable, multimode fiber and singlemode fiber, to other types of cable are all possible with the wide array of solutions from Signamax Connectivity Systems. Complete Selection Of Fiber Optic Media Converters- Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converters-Mulitmode Fiber Optic Media Converters- Stand Alone Fiber Optic Media Converters- Industrial Fiber Optic Media Converters- Gigabit Fiber Optic Media Converters-T1-E-1 Fiber Optic Media Converters-Copper To Fiber Media Converters

Managed Media Converters Chassis System

18-Bay Rack Mount Managed Media Converter Chassis System - Fiber Optic Media Converter System
10/100 To 100FX Managed Converters - 10/100 Managed Fiber Optic Media Converters
10/100 To 100FX Single Fiber WDM Managed Converters - 10/100 WDM Fiber Optic Media Converters
100FX Singlemode To Multimode Managed Converters -100 FX Fiber Optic Media Converters
ATM Singlemode To Multimode Managed Converters - ATM Fiber Optic Media Converters
1000LX To 1000SX/LX Managed Converters - 1000 LX Fiber Optic Media Converters

Stand Alone Managed Media Converters


10/100 To 100FX Managed Stand Alone Converters- 10/100 managed Stand Alone Fiber Optic Media Converters
10/100 To 100FX Single Fiber WMD Managed Stand Alone Converters - 10/100 FX Fiber Optic Media Converters
10/100/1000 To 1000SX/LX Managed Media Converters - 10/100/1000 SX/LX Fiber Optic Media Converters

Unmanaged Media Converters

10/100 To 100FX Converters With Link Fault Signaling (LFS) - 10/100 FX Fiber Optic Media Converters
10/100 To 100FX Converters With Link Fault Signaling & USB Port 10/100 Link Fault Fiber Optic Media Converters
10/100 To 100FX Mini Converters - 10/100 FX Mini Fiber Optic Media Converters
10/100 To 100FX PCI Based Converters - 10/100 FX PCI Media Converters
10/100 To 100FX Single Fiber WDM Converters With LFS 10/100FX WDM Media Converters
10/100 To 100FX PoE Converters - 10/100 FX POE Fiber Optic Media Converters
10/100/1000 To 1000SX/LX Converters - 10/100/1000 SX/LX Converters
Gigabit Ethernet Media Converters - Gigabit Ethernet Media Converters
100BaseTX To 100BaseFX Converters - 100 Base TX FX Fiber Optic Media Converters
10BaseT To 10BaseFL Converters 10 Base T Fiber Optic Converters
10BaseT To 10Base2 Converter - 10 Base T 10Base 2 Fiber Optic Converters
100FX Singlemode To Multimode Converters 100FX Fiber Optic Converters
ATM Singlemode to Multimode Converters - ATM Fiber Optic Converters
16-Bay Rack Mount Media Converter Chassis 16 Bay Fiber Optic Media Converters- 16 Bay Rack Mount Fiber Optic Converters
12-Channel Rack Mount Fiber Optic Media Converters - 12 Channel Rack Mount Fiber Optic Converters

Industrial DIN-Rail Mount Hardened Media Converters

10/100 To 100FX DIN-Rail Mount Hardened Converters- 10/100 DIN Rail Fiber Optic Converters
10/100 To 100FX WDM DIN-Rail Mount Hardened Converters 10/100 WDM Rail Mount Fiber Converters

Fiber Optic Media Converters-Complete Selection Of Telephone Extenders-Fiber Optic Media Converters- Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converters-Mulitmode Fiber Optic Media Converters- Stand Alone Fiber Optic Media Converters- Industrial Fiber Optic Media Converters- Gigabit Fiber Optic Media Converters-T1-E-1 Fiber Optic Media Converters-Copper To Fiber Media Converters

Milan Media Converters- Complete Selection Of Fiber Optic Media Converters- Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converters-Mulitmode Fiber Optic Media Converters- Stand Alone Fiber Optic MEdia Converters- Industrial Fiber Optic Media Converters- Gigabit Fiber Optic Media Converters-T1-E-1 Fiber Optic Media Converters-Copper To Fiber Media Converters

Transition Media Converters -Complete Selection Of Fiber Optic Media Converters- Singlemode Fiber Optic Media Converters-Mulitmode Fiber Optic Media Converters- Stand Alone Fiber Optic Media Converters- Industrial Fiber Optic Media Converters- Gigabit Fiber Optic Media Converters-T1-E-1 Fiber Optic Media Converters-Copper To Fiber Media Converters

Type Part Number Description
Fiber Optic Media Converter

ATSCXL-32M1-2

Fiber Optic Media Converter 10/100 Base-TX/FX Bridge Converter 2KM, SC Connector (Multi-Mode)
Fiber Optic Media Converter

ATSCXL-32M2-2

Fiber Optic Media Converter 10/100 Base-TX/FX Bridge Converter 2KM, ST Connector (Multi-Mode)
Fiber Optic Media Converter

ATSCXL-32S1-20

Fiber Optic Media Converter 10/100 Base-TX/FX Bridge Converter 20KM, SC Connector (Single-Mode)

Fiber Optic Media Converter

ATSCXL-32S1-40

Fiber Optic Media Converter 10/100 Base-TX/FX Bridge Converter 40KM, SC Connector (Single-Mode)
Fiber Optic Media Converter

ATSCXL-32S1-60

Fiber Optic Media Converter 10/100 Base-TX/FX Bridge Converter 60KM, SC Connector (Single-Mode)
Fiber Optic Media Converter

ATSCXL-32S1-100

Fiber Optic Media Converter 10/100 Base-TX/FX Bridge Converter 100KM, SC Connector (Single-Mode)
Fiber Optic Media Converter

ATSCXL-LFPSC-M2

Fiber Optic Media Converter 10/100 Base-TX/FX Bridge Converter 2KM, SC Connector, with LFP Function (Multi-Mode)

Fiber Optic Media Converter

ATSCXL-B32S1-20

Fiber Optic Media Converter 10/100 Base-TX/FX Single Fiber (BIDI) Bi-Directional Converter 20Km, SC Connector (Tx:1310nm Rx:1550nm over One Fiber)
Fiber Optic Media Converter

ATSCXL-B33S1-20

Fiber Optic Media Converter 10/100 Base-TX/FX Single Fiber (BIDI) Bi-Directional Converter 20Km, SC Connector (Tx:1550nm Rx:1310nm over One Fiber)
Fiber Optic Media Converter

ATSCXL-MTS1121-20

Fiber Optic Media Converter 100 Base FX Multi-Mode to Single-Mode Converter, SC Connector (Multi-Mode 2Km to Single-Mode 20Km)
Fiber Optic Media Converter

ATSCXL-MTS1121-40

Fiber Optic Media Converter 101 Base FX Multi-Mode to Single-Mode Converter, SC Connector (Multi-Mode 2Km to Single-Mode 40Km)
Fiber Optic Media Converter

ATSCXL-MTS1121-60

Fiber Optic Media Converter 102 Base FX Multi-Mode to Single-Mode Converter, SC Connector (Multi-Mode 2Km to Single-Mode 60Km)
Fiber Optic Media Converter

ATSCXL-G2M1-550

Fiber Optic Media Converter Gigabit Ethernet 1000Mbps Media Converter, 500m, SC Connector (Multi-Mode)
Fiber Optic Media Converter

ATSCXL-G2S1-10

Fiber Optic Media Converter Gigabit Ethernet 1000Mbps Media Converter, 10Km, SC Connector (Single-Mode)
Fiber Optic Media Converter

ATSCXL-BG2S1-10

Fiber Optic Media Converter Gigabit Ethernet 1000Mbps (BIDI) Bi-Directional Media Converter, 10Km, SC Connector (Tx:1310nm and Rx:1550nm Over One Fiber)
Fiber Optic Media Converter

ATSCXL-BG3S1-10

Fiber Optic Media Converter Gigabit Ethernet 1000Mbps (BIDI) Bi-Directional Media Converter, 10Km, SC Connector (Tx:1550nm and Rx:1310nm Over One Fiber)
Fiber Optic Media Converter

ATSCXL-BG2S1-20

Fiber Optic Media Converter Gigabit Ethernet 1000Mbps (BIDI) Bi-Directional Media Converter, 20Km, SC Connector (Tx:1310nm and Rx:1550nm Over One Fiber)
Fiber Optic Media Converter

ATSCXL-BG3S1-20

Fiber Optic Media Converter Gigabit Ethernet 1000Mbps (BIDI) Bi-Directional Media Converter, 20Km SC Connector (Tx:1550nm and Rx:1310nm Over One Fiber)

Our Cat 6 patch cords exceptional bandwidth capabilities may allow Gigabit Ethernet operation without complex DSP (Digital Signal

Unmanaged Media Converters

Signamax Connectivity Systems’ Switching Media Converters with Link Fault Signaling (LFS) provide the means for an SNMP-Managed switch to recognize a failure on a fiber channel or twisted-pair connection, enabling the switch to automatically route to a backup path if the connected switch is equipped with Spanning Tree Algorithm. This intelligence maximizes the power of managed switches, and enables fail-safe design solutions for complex networks. These converters also extend the maximum singlemode fiber distance, spanning over 46 miles with the 065-1120XLD model.

The built-in 10/100 switch enables the fiber cable connection to operate at 100 Mbps connected to either a 10BaseT or a 100BaseTX network, while remaining completely 100BaseFX standard-compliant. Fiber connection can also operate in full duplex mode whether the RJ-45 port is connected to a full duplex switch or a half duplex hub, with the built-in switch providing the network segmentation that permits the maximum fiber distance.  Each Media Converter provides a 10/100BaseT/TX auto-negotiating RJ-45 twisted-pair connector port featuring store-and-forward switching architecture. Auto-MDIX capability on the twisted-pair port allows for convenient connections.

KEY FEATURES

·    Built-In Twisted-Pair Port 10/100 Switch

·    Auto-Negotiation RJ-45 Connector with Auto-MDIX

·    SC, ST, MT-RJ, VF-45 or SC Connector

·    LEDs for Functions, Links & Activity

·    Link Fault Signaling For Use With Managed

Switches

·    1,024 MAC Address Capacity

·    Store-and-Forward Architecture

·    Full and Half Duplex Operation

·    Singlemode Spans up to 75 Km

·    Wall or Chassis Mountable

·    IEEE 802.3 and IEEE 802.3u Compliant

·    Lifetime Performance Warranty

ORDERING INFORMATION

Part Number

Description

Multimode Converters

065-1100

10/100 to 100FX MM/ST, 2 km Converter w/Link Fault Signaling

065-1110

10/100 to 100FX MM/SC, 2 km Converter w/Link Fault Signaling

065-1170

10/100 to 100FX MM/VF-45, 2 km Converter w/Link Fault Signaling

065-1172

10/100 to 100FX MM/MT-RJ, 2 km Converter w/Link Fault Signaling

065-1174

10/100 to 100FX MM/LC, 2 km Converter w/Link Fault Signaling

Singlemode Converters

065-1120

10/100 to 100FX SM/SC, 15 km Converter w/Link Fault Signaling

065-1120ED

10/100 to 100FX SM/SC, 40 km Converter w/Link Fault Signaling

065-1120XLD

10/100 to 100FX SM/SC, 75 km Converter w/Link Fault Signaling

DIN Rail Mounting Brackets

065-11DINMT

DIN Rail mounts bracket for 065-11xx series media converters

SPECIFICATIONS

·    APPLICABLE STANDARDS

IEEE 802.3 10BaseT

IEEE 802.3u 100BaseTX

IEEE 802.3u 100BaseFX

·    FIXED PORTS

Models: 065-1100/1110/1170/1172/1174/1120/1120ES

1120XLD

1 Auto-MDIX twisted-pair port meeting IEEE 802.3 10BaseT & IEEE 802.3u 100BaseTX standard specifications; Category 5 or better cable, 100 meters maximum distance for 100BaseTX, Category 3 or better cable, 100 meters maximum distance for 10BaseT

plus

1 fiber optic port meeting IEEE 802.3u 100BaseFX standard specification; 62.5/125 or 50/125 micron multimode fiber optic cable, 2,000 meters maximum distance

or

1 fiber optic port meeting IEEE 802.3u 100BaseFX standard specification; 9/125 micron singlemode fiber optic cable, spanning: 15 kilometers maximum distance (Model 065-1120)

or

40 kilometers maximum distance (Model 065-1120ED)

or

75 kilometers maximum distance (Model 065-1120XLD)

·    LED INDICATORS

Per Unit: Power status, RJ-45 port speed

Per Port: LNK/ACT, FDX/COL

Six LEDs total

·    PERFORMANCE

Latency: < 4.2 µs (LIFO)

Throughput @ 100Base: 148,809 pps (64-byte packets)

Speed: 

100BaseTX: 100/200 Mbps for half/full duplex

10BaseT: 10/20 Mbps for half/full duplex

Switching Method: Store-and-Forward

Maximum MAC Addresses: 1,024 entries

Memory: 256 KB

·    FIBER INTERFACE, MULTIMODE MODELS

Type: LED

Wavelength: 1300 nm nominal (1270 nm maximum, 1380 nm minimum)

Maximum Output Power: - 14.0 dBm

Minimum Output Power: - 20.0 dBm

Sensitivity: -33.0 dBm

Maximum Input Power: - 8.0 dBm

Link Power Budget: 13.0 dB

·    FIBER INTERFACE, SINGLEMODE PN 065-1120

Type: MQW Laser

Wavelength: 1300 nm nominal (1260 nm maximum, 1360 nm minimum)

Maximum Output Power: - 7.0 dBm

Minimum Output Power: - 15.0 dBm

Sensitivity: -34.0 dBm

Maximum Input Power: - 7.0 dBm

Link Power Budget: 19.0 dB

·    FIBER INTERFACE, SINGLEMODE PN 065-1120ED

Type: MQW Laser

Wavelength: 1300 nm nominal (1261 nm maximum, 1360 nm minimum)

Maximum Output Power: - 5.0 dBm

Minimum Output Power: - 12.0 dBm

Sensitivity: -35.0 dBm

Maximum Input Power: - 5.0 dBm

Link Power Budget: 23.0 dB

·    FIBER INTERFACE, SINGLEMODE PN 065-1120XLD

Type: MQW Laser

Wavelength: 1300 nm nominal (1270 nm maximum, 1350 nm minimum)

Maximum Output Power: + 3.0 dBm

Minimum Output Power: - 3.0 dBm

Sensitivity: -37.0 dBm

Maximum Input Power: - 0.0 dBm

Link Power Budget: 34.0 dB

·    PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Case dimensions: 4.33"L x 3.19"W x 0.91"H

 (110mm x 81mm x 23mm)

Fiber connector protrusion varies with model.

Weight: 0.33 pounds (150 grams)

·    ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTERISTICS

Operating Temperature: 32°F ~ 104°F (0°C ~ 40°C)

Storage Temperature: -13°F ~ 158°F (-25°C ~ 70°C)

Relative Humidity: 10 ~ 90%, non-condensing

·    POWER

External power adapter: 12 Volts DC; 600 mA

Power Consumption: 5 Watts Maximum

·    EMISSIONS

FCC part 15 Class A, CISPR Class A, VCCI Class A, CE Mark

·    SAFETY

UL Listed

·    WARRANTY

Lifetime

 

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